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CONTACT
Land Use Program
(805) 654-2830
Rebecca Lustig
Hours of Operation
M-Th 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Fri 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Counter Hours
M-Th 7:30-9:00 a.m.
4:00-5:00 p.m.

Fri 8:00 to 9:00 a.m.
4:00-5:00 p.m.


FAQs

What is the difference between a water/sewer availability letter and a will-serve letter?

Availability letters are required to be submitted with a discretionary project review application at the beginning of the process.  Availability letters indicate that a public water supply or public sewer is available with sufficient capacity to serve a proposed project.

Will-serve letters are filed after the project review process has been completed.  Will-serve letters are binding agreements ensuring that the proposed project will have connections to the water supplier or sewer provider.  Typically, a will-serve letter is required in order to obtain a building permit or recordation of a subdivision.  For subdivisions, there is a specific form referred to as the Environmental Health Division Water Supply Certificate  or Sewer Service Certificate  for Subdivisions.  The form is also available at the Environmental Health Division counter.

I had my water well tested when I drilled it, can I use the old water quality test?

The water quality test is considered current when the test was performed within one (1) year of project submittal.  If the water supply has been certified by the Environmental Health Division in the past, asbestos results that are greater than one (1) year old may be submitted with the project application.  Please contact the Environmental Health Division’s Land Use Coordinator to verify the use of old test data.

My lot is vacant and doesn’t have a water well on it yet, do I have to drill a well before I submit my discretionary permit application?

With the exception of a Conditional Certificate of Compliance project, a domestic supply of water must be verified during the review process.  In most cases, a well must be drilled prior to project submittal in order to provide the necessary tests for the project review.  Please contact the Environmental Health Division’s Land Use Coordinator to verify the requirements.

My lot is vacant and doesn’t have a sewer connection available.  A septic system will be installed in the future, do I have to get a soils report done before I submit my discretionary permit application?

With the exception of a Conditional Certificate of Compliance project, a feasible method of sewage disposal must be demonstrated during the review process.  A soils report, which demonstrates that a septic system is feasible for the project, is required at the time of project submittal.

What is a County Service Area 32 (CSA 32)?  Why do I need a CSA 32?

A CSA 32 is a septic monitoring and maintenance district established for property owners that have an alternate type of Onsite Wastewater Treatment System (septic system); or have hazardous materials/waste and an Onsite Wastewater Treatment System.

Why is my project subject to the requirements of the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board?

In regards to Onsite Sewage Treatment Systems (septic systems), the Regional Water Board has adopted an Order which requires their approval for discharge of sewage from commercial and multi-family systems.  A commercial discharge consists of non-residential operations, including but not limited to offices, public use of facilities, restaurants, schools, etc…  Multi-family units consist of 3 or more connected dwellings units.

The Environmental Health Division (EHD) will continue to review and permit septic systems for all residential systems; no authorization is required from the Regional Water Board.  For commercial and multi-family systems, EHD will continue to review and permit the septic systems for construction purposes.  An authorization from the Regional Water Board will be necessary for EHD to process the permits.

If the requirements relate to stormwater discharge permits, please contact the Watershed Protection District for more information.